"My body is tired and I’m tired of my body."

(Source: hai-lei)

(Source: kaitlinraison)

italianartsociety:

Alessandro Algardi was born in Bologna in this day in 1598. After working in Bologna, Mantua, and Venice, Algardi moved to Rome where he became one of the leading sculptors of the High Baroque period and a rival to Gianlorenzo Bernini. Following the lead of François Duequesnoy, Algardi adopted a classicizing style that offered an alternative to the high drama of Bernini. Contemporaries saw them as equals, if competitors, and this rivalry likely inspired each artist to ever greater virtuosity. Bernini had been the favorite of Pope Urban VIII, but Innocent X (r. 1644-55) preferred Algardi, which brought him the acclaim he had desired, and deserved, since his arrival in Rome.
Reference: Rudolf Preimesberger. “Algardi, Alessandro.” Grove Art Online. Oxford Art Online. Oxford University Press. <http://www.oxfordartonline.com/subscriber/article/grove/art/T001772>.
Beheading of St Paul, c. 1650, Marble, San Paolo Maggiore, Bologna
Monument of Pope Leo XI, 1634-44, Marble, New St. Peter’s, Rome
The Meeting of Leo I and Attila, 1646-53, Marble, New St. Peter’s, Rome
St Mary Magdalene, 1629, Stucco, San Silvestro al Quirinale, Rome

The Holy Family with Two Angels, black chalk on off-white laid paper. New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art: Purchase, Fletcher Fund, and Mr. and Mrs. David M. Tobey, Susan H. Seidel, and Sayn-Wittgenstein Fine Art Inc. Gifts, 1997. italianartsociety:

Alessandro Algardi was born in Bologna in this day in 1598. After working in Bologna, Mantua, and Venice, Algardi moved to Rome where he became one of the leading sculptors of the High Baroque period and a rival to Gianlorenzo Bernini. Following the lead of François Duequesnoy, Algardi adopted a classicizing style that offered an alternative to the high drama of Bernini. Contemporaries saw them as equals, if competitors, and this rivalry likely inspired each artist to ever greater virtuosity. Bernini had been the favorite of Pope Urban VIII, but Innocent X (r. 1644-55) preferred Algardi, which brought him the acclaim he had desired, and deserved, since his arrival in Rome.
Reference: Rudolf Preimesberger. “Algardi, Alessandro.” Grove Art Online. Oxford Art Online. Oxford University Press. <http://www.oxfordartonline.com/subscriber/article/grove/art/T001772>.
Beheading of St Paul, c. 1650, Marble, San Paolo Maggiore, Bologna
Monument of Pope Leo XI, 1634-44, Marble, New St. Peter’s, Rome
The Meeting of Leo I and Attila, 1646-53, Marble, New St. Peter’s, Rome
St Mary Magdalene, 1629, Stucco, San Silvestro al Quirinale, Rome

The Holy Family with Two Angels, black chalk on off-white laid paper. New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art: Purchase, Fletcher Fund, and Mr. and Mrs. David M. Tobey, Susan H. Seidel, and Sayn-Wittgenstein Fine Art Inc. Gifts, 1997. italianartsociety:

Alessandro Algardi was born in Bologna in this day in 1598. After working in Bologna, Mantua, and Venice, Algardi moved to Rome where he became one of the leading sculptors of the High Baroque period and a rival to Gianlorenzo Bernini. Following the lead of François Duequesnoy, Algardi adopted a classicizing style that offered an alternative to the high drama of Bernini. Contemporaries saw them as equals, if competitors, and this rivalry likely inspired each artist to ever greater virtuosity. Bernini had been the favorite of Pope Urban VIII, but Innocent X (r. 1644-55) preferred Algardi, which brought him the acclaim he had desired, and deserved, since his arrival in Rome.
Reference: Rudolf Preimesberger. “Algardi, Alessandro.” Grove Art Online. Oxford Art Online. Oxford University Press. <http://www.oxfordartonline.com/subscriber/article/grove/art/T001772>.
Beheading of St Paul, c. 1650, Marble, San Paolo Maggiore, Bologna
Monument of Pope Leo XI, 1634-44, Marble, New St. Peter’s, Rome
The Meeting of Leo I and Attila, 1646-53, Marble, New St. Peter’s, Rome
St Mary Magdalene, 1629, Stucco, San Silvestro al Quirinale, Rome

The Holy Family with Two Angels, black chalk on off-white laid paper. New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art: Purchase, Fletcher Fund, and Mr. and Mrs. David M. Tobey, Susan H. Seidel, and Sayn-Wittgenstein Fine Art Inc. Gifts, 1997. italianartsociety:

Alessandro Algardi was born in Bologna in this day in 1598. After working in Bologna, Mantua, and Venice, Algardi moved to Rome where he became one of the leading sculptors of the High Baroque period and a rival to Gianlorenzo Bernini. Following the lead of François Duequesnoy, Algardi adopted a classicizing style that offered an alternative to the high drama of Bernini. Contemporaries saw them as equals, if competitors, and this rivalry likely inspired each artist to ever greater virtuosity. Bernini had been the favorite of Pope Urban VIII, but Innocent X (r. 1644-55) preferred Algardi, which brought him the acclaim he had desired, and deserved, since his arrival in Rome.
Reference: Rudolf Preimesberger. “Algardi, Alessandro.” Grove Art Online. Oxford Art Online. Oxford University Press. <http://www.oxfordartonline.com/subscriber/article/grove/art/T001772>.
Beheading of St Paul, c. 1650, Marble, San Paolo Maggiore, Bologna
Monument of Pope Leo XI, 1634-44, Marble, New St. Peter’s, Rome
The Meeting of Leo I and Attila, 1646-53, Marble, New St. Peter’s, Rome
St Mary Magdalene, 1629, Stucco, San Silvestro al Quirinale, Rome

The Holy Family with Two Angels, black chalk on off-white laid paper. New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art: Purchase, Fletcher Fund, and Mr. and Mrs. David M. Tobey, Susan H. Seidel, and Sayn-Wittgenstein Fine Art Inc. Gifts, 1997.

italianartsociety:

Alessandro Algardi was born in Bologna in this day in 1598. After working in Bologna, Mantua, and Venice, Algardi moved to Rome where he became one of the leading sculptors of the High Baroque period and a rival to Gianlorenzo Bernini. Following the lead of François Duequesnoy, Algardi adopted a classicizing style that offered an alternative to the high drama of Bernini. Contemporaries saw them as equals, if competitors, and this rivalry likely inspired each artist to ever greater virtuosity. Bernini had been the favorite of Pope Urban VIII, but Innocent X (r. 1644-55) preferred Algardi, which brought him the acclaim he had desired, and deserved, since his arrival in Rome.

Reference: Rudolf Preimesberger. “Algardi, Alessandro.” Grove Art Online. Oxford Art Online. Oxford University Press. <http://www.oxfordartonline.com/subscriber/article/grove/art/T001772>.

Beheading of St Paul, c. 1650, Marble, San Paolo Maggiore, Bologna

Monument of Pope Leo XI, 1634-44, Marble, New St. Peter’s, Rome

The Meeting of Leo I and Attila, 1646-53, Marble, New St. Peter’s, Rome

St Mary Magdalene, 1629, Stucco, San Silvestro al Quirinale, Rome

The Holy Family with Two Angels, black chalk on off-white laid paper. New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art: Purchase, Fletcher Fund, and Mr. and Mrs. David M. Tobey, Susan H. Seidel, and Sayn-Wittgenstein Fine Art Inc. Gifts, 1997.

I’ve been here twice in the last 24 hours. Addiction status reached. @sudforno

bittercup-trashup:

City Sirens in Gray, GA.

Storms a-coming

Outdoor synth jam at the farm

thorneater:

COFFEE FOR CMC

(Source: ghsdiy)

arpeggia:

Robert Stadler's light installation at St. Paul St. Louis Church, Paris (Nuit Blanche), 2007
Photo by Marc Domage
Visitors enter the church through a lateral door and first see a scattered group of luminous spheres hovering in the choir. As one approaches the center of the nave, the spheres form a giant question mark. They become a punctuation mark superimposed over the religious symbols. Then as one moves through the church, the question mark decomposes. The figure becomes abstracted again in order to echo the hanging lights of the cathedral. Contrasting with the symmetry of the edifice, these luminous suspension points are like a musical notation, or holes punctuating the architectural volume. The question (or doubt) is absorbed by the space. Commissioned by Olga Milogrodzka for the Baltic See Cultural Center, the installation was presented in 2009 at St. John’s church in Gdansk, Poland.
arpeggia:

Robert Stadler's light installation at St. Paul St. Louis Church, Paris (Nuit Blanche), 2007
Photo by Marc Domage
Visitors enter the church through a lateral door and first see a scattered group of luminous spheres hovering in the choir. As one approaches the center of the nave, the spheres form a giant question mark. They become a punctuation mark superimposed over the religious symbols. Then as one moves through the church, the question mark decomposes. The figure becomes abstracted again in order to echo the hanging lights of the cathedral. Contrasting with the symmetry of the edifice, these luminous suspension points are like a musical notation, or holes punctuating the architectural volume. The question (or doubt) is absorbed by the space. Commissioned by Olga Milogrodzka for the Baltic See Cultural Center, the installation was presented in 2009 at St. John’s church in Gdansk, Poland.
arpeggia:

Robert Stadler's light installation at St. Paul St. Louis Church, Paris (Nuit Blanche), 2007
Photo by Marc Domage
Visitors enter the church through a lateral door and first see a scattered group of luminous spheres hovering in the choir. As one approaches the center of the nave, the spheres form a giant question mark. They become a punctuation mark superimposed over the religious symbols. Then as one moves through the church, the question mark decomposes. The figure becomes abstracted again in order to echo the hanging lights of the cathedral. Contrasting with the symmetry of the edifice, these luminous suspension points are like a musical notation, or holes punctuating the architectural volume. The question (or doubt) is absorbed by the space. Commissioned by Olga Milogrodzka for the Baltic See Cultural Center, the installation was presented in 2009 at St. John’s church in Gdansk, Poland.

arpeggia:

Robert Stadler's light installation at St. Paul St. Louis Church, Paris (Nuit Blanche), 2007

Photo by Marc Domage

Visitors enter the church through a lateral door and first see a scattered group of luminous spheres hovering in the choir. As one approaches the center of the nave, the spheres form a giant question mark. They become a punctuation mark superimposed over the religious symbols. Then as one moves through the church, the question mark decomposes. The figure becomes abstracted again in order to echo the hanging lights of the cathedral. Contrasting with the symmetry of the edifice, these luminous suspension points are like a musical notation, or holes punctuating the architectural volume. The question (or doubt) is absorbed by the space. Commissioned by Olga Milogrodzka for the Baltic See Cultural Center, the installation was presented in 2009 at St. John’s church in Gdansk, Poland.

Getting the hang of this technique #art

Nightshade

acrylic on linen

Keight MacLean

2014

(Source: keightmaclean)

  1. Camera: Olympus E-PL1
  2. Aperture: f/3.5
  3. Exposure: 1/2th
  4. Focal Length: 14mm

Sketchbook #drawing #art

kaytealine:

Photography and Art by Caitlynn Fairbarns 

Okay so I made this for school last year. I really am proud of it. I put it up in places that weren’t exactly “allowed”. I wanted to express my feelings towards women’s rights with humour and attitude. I tried to create something that was bold, loud and confrontational. I hope you all like it. Enjoy my feminist art!

Please don’t remove my credit. Thanks!