naimabarcelona:

Ming & Sui photographed for Elle China March 2013.

Last day of my stuff up at Jinks Art Factory. Coffee, art and tattoos: pretty much the perfect business? Everyone should check them out, right by Queen and Roncesvalles. #Toronto #art #tattoo #painting

keightmacleanart:

Planning for a new series of work. Lots of fun playing in Photoshop.

Keight MacLean, 2014

insidemissmoss:

Because if you didn’t already know, I’m pine cone obsessed. 

I think I have a pine cone obsession suddenly?

keightmacleanart:

Self Portrait, 2014
oil on canvas
Keight MacLean

keightmacleanart:

Self Portrait, 2014

oil on canvas

Keight MacLean

  1. Camera: Olympus E-PL1
  2. Aperture: f/4
  3. Exposure: 1/50th
  4. Focal Length: 18mm
lindahall:

Claude Perrault - Scientist of the Day
Claude Perrault, a French physician and anatomist, was born Sep. 25, 1613. In 1666, Perrault became one of the inaugural members of the Royal Academy of Science in Paris, where he organized regular dissections of animals that had expired in the King’s menagerie at Versailles. At the time, animal anatomy was not part of natural history; it was rare for a description of an animal in a zoological encyclopedia to include any details of its inner parts. Perrault published the results of the Academy’s group dissections in 1676, and he pointedly called his book: Mémoires pour servir ą l’histoire naturelle des animaux—Memoirs for a Natural History of Animals—indicating that comparative anatomy should be an essential part of natural history. And after Perrault, it was.
We displayed Perrault’s Memoires in our 2009 exhibition, The Grandeur ofLife. The images included here are, in order: a headpiece from the Memoires, depicting the anatomists at work at the Academy; a portrait of Claude (from a book edited by his brother Charles, author of Tales from Mother Goose); and two plates from the Memoires, showing the inside and outside of a gazelle and a beaver. The plates (except for the portrait) were drawn and engraved by Sébastien Le Clerc, tomorrow’s Scientist of the Day.
Dr. William B. Ashworth, Jr., Consultant for the History of Science, Linda Hall Library and Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Missouri-Kansas City
lindahall:

Claude Perrault - Scientist of the Day
Claude Perrault, a French physician and anatomist, was born Sep. 25, 1613. In 1666, Perrault became one of the inaugural members of the Royal Academy of Science in Paris, where he organized regular dissections of animals that had expired in the King’s menagerie at Versailles. At the time, animal anatomy was not part of natural history; it was rare for a description of an animal in a zoological encyclopedia to include any details of its inner parts. Perrault published the results of the Academy’s group dissections in 1676, and he pointedly called his book: Mémoires pour servir ą l’histoire naturelle des animaux—Memoirs for a Natural History of Animals—indicating that comparative anatomy should be an essential part of natural history. And after Perrault, it was.
We displayed Perrault’s Memoires in our 2009 exhibition, The Grandeur ofLife. The images included here are, in order: a headpiece from the Memoires, depicting the anatomists at work at the Academy; a portrait of Claude (from a book edited by his brother Charles, author of Tales from Mother Goose); and two plates from the Memoires, showing the inside and outside of a gazelle and a beaver. The plates (except for the portrait) were drawn and engraved by Sébastien Le Clerc, tomorrow’s Scientist of the Day.
Dr. William B. Ashworth, Jr., Consultant for the History of Science, Linda Hall Library and Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Missouri-Kansas City
lindahall:

Claude Perrault - Scientist of the Day
Claude Perrault, a French physician and anatomist, was born Sep. 25, 1613. In 1666, Perrault became one of the inaugural members of the Royal Academy of Science in Paris, where he organized regular dissections of animals that had expired in the King’s menagerie at Versailles. At the time, animal anatomy was not part of natural history; it was rare for a description of an animal in a zoological encyclopedia to include any details of its inner parts. Perrault published the results of the Academy’s group dissections in 1676, and he pointedly called his book: Mémoires pour servir ą l’histoire naturelle des animaux—Memoirs for a Natural History of Animals—indicating that comparative anatomy should be an essential part of natural history. And after Perrault, it was.
We displayed Perrault’s Memoires in our 2009 exhibition, The Grandeur ofLife. The images included here are, in order: a headpiece from the Memoires, depicting the anatomists at work at the Academy; a portrait of Claude (from a book edited by his brother Charles, author of Tales from Mother Goose); and two plates from the Memoires, showing the inside and outside of a gazelle and a beaver. The plates (except for the portrait) were drawn and engraved by Sébastien Le Clerc, tomorrow’s Scientist of the Day.
Dr. William B. Ashworth, Jr., Consultant for the History of Science, Linda Hall Library and Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Missouri-Kansas City
lindahall:

Claude Perrault - Scientist of the Day
Claude Perrault, a French physician and anatomist, was born Sep. 25, 1613. In 1666, Perrault became one of the inaugural members of the Royal Academy of Science in Paris, where he organized regular dissections of animals that had expired in the King’s menagerie at Versailles. At the time, animal anatomy was not part of natural history; it was rare for a description of an animal in a zoological encyclopedia to include any details of its inner parts. Perrault published the results of the Academy’s group dissections in 1676, and he pointedly called his book: Mémoires pour servir ą l’histoire naturelle des animaux—Memoirs for a Natural History of Animals—indicating that comparative anatomy should be an essential part of natural history. And after Perrault, it was.
We displayed Perrault’s Memoires in our 2009 exhibition, The Grandeur ofLife. The images included here are, in order: a headpiece from the Memoires, depicting the anatomists at work at the Academy; a portrait of Claude (from a book edited by his brother Charles, author of Tales from Mother Goose); and two plates from the Memoires, showing the inside and outside of a gazelle and a beaver. The plates (except for the portrait) were drawn and engraved by Sébastien Le Clerc, tomorrow’s Scientist of the Day.
Dr. William B. Ashworth, Jr., Consultant for the History of Science, Linda Hall Library and Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Missouri-Kansas City

lindahall:

Claude Perrault - Scientist of the Day

Claude Perrault, a French physician and anatomist, was born Sep. 25, 1613. In 1666, Perrault became one of the inaugural members of the Royal Academy of Science in Paris, where he organized regular dissections of animals that had expired in the King’s menagerie at Versailles. At the time, animal anatomy was not part of natural history; it was rare for a description of an animal in a zoological encyclopedia to include any details of its inner parts. Perrault published the results of the Academy’s group dissections in 1676, and he pointedly called his book: Mémoires pour servir ą l’histoire naturelle des animauxMemoirs for a Natural History of Animals—indicating that comparative anatomy should be an essential part of natural history. And after Perrault, it was.

We displayed Perrault’s Memoires in our 2009 exhibition, The Grandeur ofLife. The images included here are, in order: a headpiece from the Memoires, depicting the anatomists at work at the Academy; a portrait of Claude (from a book edited by his brother Charles, author of Tales from Mother Goose); and two plates from the Memoires, showing the inside and outside of a gazelle and a beaver. The plates (except for the portrait) were drawn and engraved by Sébastien Le Clerc, tomorrow’s Scientist of the Day.

Dr. William B. Ashworth, Jr., Consultant for the History of Science, Linda Hall Library and Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Missouri-Kansas City

italianartsociety:

As reported by Ermanno Rivetti in the Art Newspaper, a surprisingly violent hailstorm and accompanying downpour has caused an estimated €1.5m worth of damage to museums and other historic buildings in Florence. The storm, which raged over Tuscany the afternoon of Friday, September 19, pelted the city with ice and rain, causing trees to fall and electricity to be temporarily cut off to numerous citizens and businesses.  
The Boboli Gardens, a favorite tourist destination attached to the Pitti Palace, sustained losses to its trees and landscaping. The palace itself, built by banker Luca Pitti and later expanded as a residence for the Medici Granddukes, was damaged on its famous rusticated facade and had several windows broken. Parts of its museum were closed during repairs. 
The Uffizi was evacuated during the storm, and while refunds were offered to those who could not return to the museum, many tourists were resigned to leave Florence unable to see one of its crown jewels. 

The Museo Nazionale di San Marco, housed in the former Dominican friary that was home to artists Fra Angelico and Fra Bartolommeo, as well as preacher Girolamo Savonarola, sustained leaks and damage to four paintings that have since been sent to the conservation lab.The recently restored Palazzo Davanzati suffered water damage to the rooms containing its lace collection. Damaged pieces, including some paintings, have been sent to conservators at the Opificio delle Pietre Dure in Florence. 
In addition to trees at the Boboli, the Florence Botanical Gardens sustained extensive damage of up to 80% of its trees and plants, some of which were planted during the Renaissance. Tuscany’s winemakers have estimated a loss of €20m from damage to grapes still awaiting harvest. Damage to vines and olive groves has yet to be assessed.
Museo Nazionale di San Marco, flooded and strewn with felled tree branches after hail storm of 19 September 2014. Photo credit: The Art Newspaper
San Marco after the storm. Photo credit: Lourdes Flores, Discover Tuscany blog
The cloister on a typical day in summer. Photo credit: Anne Leader.
Palazzo Pitti, Garden Facade.
Boboli Gardens downed trees. Photo credit: Lourdes Flores, Discover Tuscany blog italianartsociety:

As reported by Ermanno Rivetti in the Art Newspaper, a surprisingly violent hailstorm and accompanying downpour has caused an estimated €1.5m worth of damage to museums and other historic buildings in Florence. The storm, which raged over Tuscany the afternoon of Friday, September 19, pelted the city with ice and rain, causing trees to fall and electricity to be temporarily cut off to numerous citizens and businesses.  
The Boboli Gardens, a favorite tourist destination attached to the Pitti Palace, sustained losses to its trees and landscaping. The palace itself, built by banker Luca Pitti and later expanded as a residence for the Medici Granddukes, was damaged on its famous rusticated facade and had several windows broken. Parts of its museum were closed during repairs. 
The Uffizi was evacuated during the storm, and while refunds were offered to those who could not return to the museum, many tourists were resigned to leave Florence unable to see one of its crown jewels. 

The Museo Nazionale di San Marco, housed in the former Dominican friary that was home to artists Fra Angelico and Fra Bartolommeo, as well as preacher Girolamo Savonarola, sustained leaks and damage to four paintings that have since been sent to the conservation lab.The recently restored Palazzo Davanzati suffered water damage to the rooms containing its lace collection. Damaged pieces, including some paintings, have been sent to conservators at the Opificio delle Pietre Dure in Florence. 
In addition to trees at the Boboli, the Florence Botanical Gardens sustained extensive damage of up to 80% of its trees and plants, some of which were planted during the Renaissance. Tuscany’s winemakers have estimated a loss of €20m from damage to grapes still awaiting harvest. Damage to vines and olive groves has yet to be assessed.
Museo Nazionale di San Marco, flooded and strewn with felled tree branches after hail storm of 19 September 2014. Photo credit: The Art Newspaper
San Marco after the storm. Photo credit: Lourdes Flores, Discover Tuscany blog
The cloister on a typical day in summer. Photo credit: Anne Leader.
Palazzo Pitti, Garden Facade.
Boboli Gardens downed trees. Photo credit: Lourdes Flores, Discover Tuscany blog italianartsociety:

As reported by Ermanno Rivetti in the Art Newspaper, a surprisingly violent hailstorm and accompanying downpour has caused an estimated €1.5m worth of damage to museums and other historic buildings in Florence. The storm, which raged over Tuscany the afternoon of Friday, September 19, pelted the city with ice and rain, causing trees to fall and electricity to be temporarily cut off to numerous citizens and businesses.  
The Boboli Gardens, a favorite tourist destination attached to the Pitti Palace, sustained losses to its trees and landscaping. The palace itself, built by banker Luca Pitti and later expanded as a residence for the Medici Granddukes, was damaged on its famous rusticated facade and had several windows broken. Parts of its museum were closed during repairs. 
The Uffizi was evacuated during the storm, and while refunds were offered to those who could not return to the museum, many tourists were resigned to leave Florence unable to see one of its crown jewels. 

The Museo Nazionale di San Marco, housed in the former Dominican friary that was home to artists Fra Angelico and Fra Bartolommeo, as well as preacher Girolamo Savonarola, sustained leaks and damage to four paintings that have since been sent to the conservation lab.The recently restored Palazzo Davanzati suffered water damage to the rooms containing its lace collection. Damaged pieces, including some paintings, have been sent to conservators at the Opificio delle Pietre Dure in Florence. 
In addition to trees at the Boboli, the Florence Botanical Gardens sustained extensive damage of up to 80% of its trees and plants, some of which were planted during the Renaissance. Tuscany’s winemakers have estimated a loss of €20m from damage to grapes still awaiting harvest. Damage to vines and olive groves has yet to be assessed.
Museo Nazionale di San Marco, flooded and strewn with felled tree branches after hail storm of 19 September 2014. Photo credit: The Art Newspaper
San Marco after the storm. Photo credit: Lourdes Flores, Discover Tuscany blog
The cloister on a typical day in summer. Photo credit: Anne Leader.
Palazzo Pitti, Garden Facade.
Boboli Gardens downed trees. Photo credit: Lourdes Flores, Discover Tuscany blog italianartsociety:

As reported by Ermanno Rivetti in the Art Newspaper, a surprisingly violent hailstorm and accompanying downpour has caused an estimated €1.5m worth of damage to museums and other historic buildings in Florence. The storm, which raged over Tuscany the afternoon of Friday, September 19, pelted the city with ice and rain, causing trees to fall and electricity to be temporarily cut off to numerous citizens and businesses.  
The Boboli Gardens, a favorite tourist destination attached to the Pitti Palace, sustained losses to its trees and landscaping. The palace itself, built by banker Luca Pitti and later expanded as a residence for the Medici Granddukes, was damaged on its famous rusticated facade and had several windows broken. Parts of its museum were closed during repairs. 
The Uffizi was evacuated during the storm, and while refunds were offered to those who could not return to the museum, many tourists were resigned to leave Florence unable to see one of its crown jewels. 

The Museo Nazionale di San Marco, housed in the former Dominican friary that was home to artists Fra Angelico and Fra Bartolommeo, as well as preacher Girolamo Savonarola, sustained leaks and damage to four paintings that have since been sent to the conservation lab.The recently restored Palazzo Davanzati suffered water damage to the rooms containing its lace collection. Damaged pieces, including some paintings, have been sent to conservators at the Opificio delle Pietre Dure in Florence. 
In addition to trees at the Boboli, the Florence Botanical Gardens sustained extensive damage of up to 80% of its trees and plants, some of which were planted during the Renaissance. Tuscany’s winemakers have estimated a loss of €20m from damage to grapes still awaiting harvest. Damage to vines and olive groves has yet to be assessed.
Museo Nazionale di San Marco, flooded and strewn with felled tree branches after hail storm of 19 September 2014. Photo credit: The Art Newspaper
San Marco after the storm. Photo credit: Lourdes Flores, Discover Tuscany blog
The cloister on a typical day in summer. Photo credit: Anne Leader.
Palazzo Pitti, Garden Facade.
Boboli Gardens downed trees. Photo credit: Lourdes Flores, Discover Tuscany blog italianartsociety:

As reported by Ermanno Rivetti in the Art Newspaper, a surprisingly violent hailstorm and accompanying downpour has caused an estimated €1.5m worth of damage to museums and other historic buildings in Florence. The storm, which raged over Tuscany the afternoon of Friday, September 19, pelted the city with ice and rain, causing trees to fall and electricity to be temporarily cut off to numerous citizens and businesses.  
The Boboli Gardens, a favorite tourist destination attached to the Pitti Palace, sustained losses to its trees and landscaping. The palace itself, built by banker Luca Pitti and later expanded as a residence for the Medici Granddukes, was damaged on its famous rusticated facade and had several windows broken. Parts of its museum were closed during repairs. 
The Uffizi was evacuated during the storm, and while refunds were offered to those who could not return to the museum, many tourists were resigned to leave Florence unable to see one of its crown jewels. 

The Museo Nazionale di San Marco, housed in the former Dominican friary that was home to artists Fra Angelico and Fra Bartolommeo, as well as preacher Girolamo Savonarola, sustained leaks and damage to four paintings that have since been sent to the conservation lab.The recently restored Palazzo Davanzati suffered water damage to the rooms containing its lace collection. Damaged pieces, including some paintings, have been sent to conservators at the Opificio delle Pietre Dure in Florence. 
In addition to trees at the Boboli, the Florence Botanical Gardens sustained extensive damage of up to 80% of its trees and plants, some of which were planted during the Renaissance. Tuscany’s winemakers have estimated a loss of €20m from damage to grapes still awaiting harvest. Damage to vines and olive groves has yet to be assessed.
Museo Nazionale di San Marco, flooded and strewn with felled tree branches after hail storm of 19 September 2014. Photo credit: The Art Newspaper
San Marco after the storm. Photo credit: Lourdes Flores, Discover Tuscany blog
The cloister on a typical day in summer. Photo credit: Anne Leader.
Palazzo Pitti, Garden Facade.
Boboli Gardens downed trees. Photo credit: Lourdes Flores, Discover Tuscany blog

italianartsociety:

As reported by Ermanno Rivetti in the Art Newspaper, a surprisingly violent hailstorm and accompanying downpour has caused an estimated €1.5m worth of damage to museums and other historic buildings in Florence. The storm, which raged over Tuscany the afternoon of Friday, September 19, pelted the city with ice and rain, causing trees to fall and electricity to be temporarily cut off to numerous citizens and businesses.  

The Boboli Gardens, a favorite tourist destination attached to the Pitti Palace, sustained losses to its trees and landscaping. The palace itself, built by banker Luca Pitti and later expanded as a residence for the Medici Granddukes, was damaged on its famous rusticated facade and had several windows broken. Parts of its museum were closed during repairs. 

The Uffizi was evacuated during the storm, and while refunds were offered to those who could not return to the museum, many tourists were resigned to leave Florence unable to see one of its crown jewels. 

The Museo Nazionale di San Marco, housed in the former Dominican friary that was home to artists Fra Angelico and Fra Bartolommeo, as well as preacher Girolamo Savonarola, sustained leaks and damage to four paintings that have since been sent to the conservation lab.

The recently restored Palazzo Davanzati suffered water damage to the rooms containing its lace collection. Damaged pieces, including some paintings, have been sent to conservators at the Opificio delle Pietre Dure in Florence.

In addition to trees at the Boboli, the Florence Botanical Gardens sustained extensive damage of up to 80% of its trees and plants, some of which were planted during the Renaissance. Tuscany’s winemakers have estimated a loss of €20m from damage to grapes still awaiting harvest. Damage to vines and olive groves has yet to be assessed.

Museo Nazionale di San Marco, flooded and strewn with felled tree branches after hail storm of 19 September 2014. Photo credit: The Art Newspaper

San Marco after the storm. Photo credit: Lourdes Flores, Discover Tuscany blog

The cloister on a typical day in summer. Photo credit: Anne Leader.

Palazzo Pitti, Garden Facade.

Boboli Gardens downed trees. Photo credit: Lourdes Flores, Discover Tuscany blog

that-fandom-blog:

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

thiscorpsofbrothers:

jasbeaw:

What do you mean, vet’s office? YOU SAID WE WERE GOING TO THE PHILHARMONIC!

i’ve reblogged this at least seven times and i don’t regret any of them

I WILL BE OVERDRESSED

HUMAN

YOU HAVE MADE ME MAKE A SOCIAL FAUX PAS

It’s a faux paw

(Source: bluebonne)

(Source: e53363)

Love the textures of oil paint #art #painting #texture

Conveniently sized art keeps curious kitty cats from wandering inside and claiming our apartment as their own #art #cats

Thinking of Italy

ilbuetattoo:

Day 2 @ italian tattoo artists in Torino #forearms #stag beetle #moth #lines #black #blackworkers #dotwork #wheat